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KUWAIT ABANDONS PLANS FOR FOUR NUKES, OTHER ARAB COUNTRIES DO NOT – YET

24 Feb 2012

KUWAIT CITY – KUWAIT ABANDONS PLANS TO BUILD FOUR (4) NUKES BY 2022.  Officials of the Kuwaiti government at the Kuwaiti “Institute for Scientific Research” made the announcement on 22 Feb 2012.  Institute’s scientist Osama al-Sayegh, and two colleagues, said the Fukushima incident resulted in the public questioning the necessity of building Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) in oil-rich Kuwait.  There was also the question of where Kuwait would store the radioactive waste generated by the NPPs. THOSE ARE THE QUESTIONS EVERY COUNTRY WITH NPP BUILDING INTENTIONS NEEDS TO ANSWER.  WE ARE HAPPY TO SEE TO SEE KUWAITI LEADERS HAVE SHOWN A “POST FUKUSHIMA” WISDOM.  PERHAPS OTHER ARAB COUNTRIES WILL ALSO “SEE THE BLINKING RED LIGHT”.  

KUWAIT’S INTEREST IN NPPs BEGAN ABOUT  2009, when the country announced plans to invest in NPPs to preserve its oil reserves. At that time Kuwaiti officials signed agreements with the USA, France and Russia, to boost bilateral cooperation in developing an “indigenous civilian atomic energy infrastructure”.  Kuwait’s interest in NPPs peaked in September 2010, when “Kuwait’s National Nuclear Energy Committee” announced that it was considering options for four(4) planned 1,000 megawatt(Mw) NPPs, and would release a national “road map” (A WELL-THOUGHT OUT PLAN)for developing civilian nuclear electrical power generation in Jan 2011;  Then…

ON 12 MAR 2011,  the  Fukushima Tragic Triple-Meltdown occurred. The political and socio-economic fallout caused Kuwaiti Emir Sabah Al Ahmed Al Sabah, to order that the Kuwaiti “National Nuclear Energy Committee” be dissolved for months.  Kuwait’s decision to abandon nuclear power has not surprised local analyst Robin Mills, an energy researcher in Dubai, said: “A couple of months ago there was an announcement that Kuwait was rethinking its nuclear plans…But I wouldn’t draw wider implications into the (Persian) Gulf’s nuclear policy”.

OTHER ARAB COUNTRIES ARE STILL”GO” NUCLEAR  Kuwait’s non-nuclear intentions have not kept Kuwait’s Persian Gulf neighbor, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), from pressing forward with its plans to construct four(4) NPPs in a remote area outside Abu Dhabi.  The UAE program is going ahead, and seems to be on schedule- construction has started; Other Arab countries, such as Saudi Arabia planning to build six(6) NPPs  during the next 20 years, and Jordan which appears to be behind NPP plans, but is zig-zaging on the issue.

Edward Oliver Gonzalez(gonzedo)

Note: All caps are my comment(s)

 

February 24, 2012 at 11:33 PM
3 comments »
  • March 1, 2012 at 9:38 PMBrite

    Your article has really inspired me to really change the way I blog. I have to tell you I appreciate all your hard work.

  • March 24, 2012 at 1:33 PMTracey

    I think it’s great. A big reason that it’s so expensive right, is a lack of significant subsidies, as well as ridiculously long gov. permit application times/fees. To store nuclear waste in the USA, The gov. should start building up Yucca Mountain again; then, start building new plants to cover our current and future needs. The USA is only going to need more electricity perhaps 15-20 yrs. from now, when the vast majority of vehicles will be electric based. To the comment about the amount of resources required to make green energy plants, I hope you understand how energy intensive and material intensive solar and wind options are.

    REPLY: Thanks for your comment. A single Nuclear Power Plant now costs about $7 to 10 Billion, and require not less than 7 years to build. They are not cheap, and produce much “nuclear waste”.
    gonzedo

  • June 1, 2012 at 5:24 PMZack

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