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JAPAN WANTS TO SIGN IAEA PROPOSED NUCLEAR DISASTER LIABILITY TREATY

3 Nov 2013

USA DEPT. OF ENERGY SEC. ERNEST MONIZ GOES TO TOKYO AND APPROVES

On 2 Nov 2013, in Tokyo U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said: “Japan would receive international help with the clean-up at the Fukushima atomic station once it joins an existing treaty that defines liability for accidents at nuclear plants, The treaty known as :The Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage, assigns accident liability to plant operators (TEPCO-The people that own and operate the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) rather than equipment and technology vendorsAs one gets into the real work, then these liability conventions become quite important…Certainly (Japanese)Prime Minster Abe and Minster Motegi both emphasize that the importance of moving on this in 2014 is to a large extent driven by their openness and their desire to get as much international help as they can…. Such help will be easier to secure once Japan ratifies the treaty … U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Trade Minister Toshimitsu Motegi , and other officials showed eagerness during meetings for expertise from abroad to decommission the Fukushima NPP. Liability would rest with TEPCO as the plant’s operator is known… this has global significance, and we all have a direct interest in seeing that the next steps are taken well, efficiently and safely.”

THE IAEA PROPOSED NUCLEAR LIABILITY TREATY – SAY WHAT?.

US DOE Secretary Moniz was in Japan to discuss cooperation with Japan with plans to ratify the The Convention on “Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Treaty”. His visit coincided with calls for a larger government role in the response to the 12 Mar 2011 triple meltdown + at the Fukushima Dai No1 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) the site of the the worst nuclear tragedy ever; and certainly since Chernobyl, in the Ukraine (formerly Russia).  TEPCO in recent months has reported large leaks of highly radioactive fluids into the Pacific Ocean. The treaty includes setting up a fund for victims of nuclear accidents and a standard for compensation claims   NOW THEN: The Compensation for Nuclear Damage treaty was adopted in 1997 under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and had 16 signatories as of 24 Jun 2013,

RADIOACTIVE WATER TREATMENT IS (STILL) THE IMMEDIATE PROBLEM

TRITIUM REMOVAL is among the contaminants found in hundreds of thousands of tons of water stored in more than 1,000 tanks at the Dai No.1 site. Those levels are rising at a rate of 400 tons a day as groundwater seeping into basements mixes with cooling water that has been in contact with highly radioactive melted reactor cores. Sec. Moniz said that other companies that could assist TEPCO are builders that have worked at U.S. nuclear sites, and have specialists in cleaning groundwater and controlling its flow without identifying particular businesses. Well… Except for California-based Kurion Inc., that owns technology for removing the radioactive isotope tritium from contaminated water… FOR CESIUM REMOVAL TEPCO has had treatment systems in place for removing the radioactive cesium since shortly after the March 2011 tragedy at the plant, and is currently testing a filter to remove the radioactive element strontium.  Moniz added that the proposed liability pact has so far not been needed by foreign companies because there’s been little direct engagement between such businesses and TEPCO, although some U.S. entities have helped the utility in a consultant role.

LINKS ALREADY EXIST BETWEEN JAPAN AND USA NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING CORPORATIONS.

A scientist at the Savanna River National Laboratory under the USA-DOE said they already helping Japan’s International Research Institute for Nuclear decommissioning by providing proposals from international entities seeking participation in the Dai No.1 plant’s decommissioning and cleanup..TEPCO said 1 Nov.2013 that it is also holding talks with The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a USA DOE research center, about getting help with groundwater management, removing fuel debris and other areas, the utility said in a statement.  TEPCO engineers have also visited the site of the Hanford Engineer Works weapons lab in Washington State, where the USA DOE has spent more than $16 billion since 1989 on cleanups, to evaluate whether methods used there could be applied at Fukushima. Sec. Moniz said: “With openness, I would say the eagerness, expressed by the (Japanese)Prime Minister and by a variety of other government officials to have international help, we see our laboratories certainly continuing to contribute and we see our companies being enabled to come in as well.”

Thanks to Bloomberg, and RT

OUR TAKE.

We must remember that the IAEA is a Vienna-based energy Barons Corp (with a 2,300 employee Secretariat) founded to protect the financial interests of the world’s Energy Industry. Let us also remember that USA DOE Sec. Moniz made a trip to the IAEA (Vienna) to address the IAEA annual report on 3 Jul 2013 ostensibly to assuage their concerns about the coal Industry (now on life support world-wide).  It occurs to us that behind the scenes a more important initiative was afoot: How to protect the Uranium NPP’s Industry now, and in the future against financial Liability. One more thing to remember: The General Director of the IAEA since 2009 until today is Mr. Yukiya Amano, a former V.P. of TEPCO.  Nuff’ said!

JAPAN NEEDS HELP WITH FUKUSHIMA

But if it is money they want to help their NPP Industry, and its victims, and to protect them against financial liability, now and in the future, they are asking the wrong country.  Evidently Sec. Moniz has not heard about the budget impasse in the USA Congress, and the talks about sequestration. Linking Japanese authorities (be it TEPCO, or the Central government) to appropriate technical consultants in the nuclear remediation field here in the USA, or anywhere in the world, is already in progress, and done privately (as it should be).  Honestly, Sec. Moniz seems totally detached from the financial realities facing the USA, yet, he offers all sorts of assistance he cannot deliver. Just to think that the Dai No. 1 cleanup and decommissioning is expected to take 40 years (I think 60 Years or longer) Unless they screw things up. Talk is Cheap!

HOW IN THE WORLD CAN WE EXPECT THE IAEA PROPOSED SHARED FINANCIAL LIABILITY TO BE IMPLEMENTED?  Naturally, the Japanese government asks:  “and all we need to do is sign to get the world to assist us financially, technically, and otherwise?” Wish it were so but it is “Pie in the Sky”.

FOOLISH PLAN TO REMOVE SOME 1,500 “SPENT FUEL RODS” NOW.  Sec. Moniz said:It appears that spent nuclear fuel will begin to be removed from Unit 4 as scheduled in mid-November The spent-fuel removal at DAI No.1 Unit 4,is considered by nuclear experts to be the toughest and most dangerous operation for TEPCO; one wrong move could result in horrific quantities of radiation being released into the atmosphere or cause an explosion many times worse than the original tragedy. PROBLEM IS: Reactor 4 “Spent-Fuel Pool” contains 10 times more Cesium-137 than Chernobyl did. Scientists have warned that another nuclear tragedy of such magnitude could be the beginning of an ultimate catastrophe for the planet.  This plan seems like too dangerous an operation, and apparently intended to make it seem like that decommissioning has begun.  These spent fuel rods are trasuranic extremely dangerous radioactive material the removal of which, if just once (out of 1,500 times), is done incorrectly, or an accident occurs due to unforeseen circumstances, could precipitate an uncontrollably nuclear chain reaction of unchartered proportions that would render the rest of the NPP facility unapproachable for decades. Just to relocate the fuel rods, but where?.   They do not even know where yet in their ever more crowded environs.  THEY MUST BE KIDDING!-I CERTAINLY HOPE SO!– JAPAN NEEDS TO GET REAL!

Edward Oliver Gonzalez (gonzedo)

 


November 3, 2013 at 11:28 PM Comments (0)